Winners

Congratulations to the 2016 NFFD Winners!

These stories will be published in the special July issue of Flash Frontier: An Adventure in Short Fiction.

FIRST

Trampolining in the Matukituki by Heather McQuillan

Regional Prize, Canterbury

SECOND

Shapeshifters on the Bus by Nod Ghosh

THIRD

The Wheatfield  by Linda Moser

*

HIGHLY COMMENDED

Calligraphy by Sue Wootton — Regional Prize, Otago

Now you are a curved white boat by Trisha Hanifin

Mayday  by Dione Jones — Regional Prize, Auckland

May 1941: Day and Night in Crete by Sam Averis

Rewilding by Zoe Meager

The Maiming of Uncle Po by Heather McQuillan

Standing Water  by Sam Averis

*

COMMENDED

An Approach to Keeping Cacti by Rachel Fenton

Beach by Alex Stronach — Regional Prize, Wellington

Dragonfly collage by Gail Ingram

Ex Libris by Michael Harlow

My Mind Is Clear by Rachel Smith

New Beginnings Nikki Crutchley — Regional Prize, Hamilton

Ophelia at Huntly by  Sian Williams — Regional Prize, Northland

Salt by Lynne Kohen

Settlement by Jac Jenkins

Stolen by Lee Kimber

The moon in a bowl of water by Michael Harlow

The Window Is Closed by Rachel Smith

The Helping Hand by Heather Sylvawood

What We Talk About When We Talk About the Treaty by Rachel Fenton

Judges’ Comments — James Norcliffe and Elizabeth Smither in conversation

Elizabeth:   Can I start by saying James was absolutely great to work with. He is a master of the felt pen and the grading system and the one-line summing-up sentence. He has the intelligence of a fox and is a better time-keeper than the White Rabbit. It was an onerous task and he made it a pleasure. And as to getting back to me – Superman couldn’t have been faster.

James:  You are too complimentary. We were perfectly complementary. My snap decisions (the fox in me?); your heartfelt consideration and wisdom (the owl in you?). Our working together demonstrated to me just how important it is to have two minds working on the judging. Often where I saw diamonds, Elizabeth saw glass, or where I saw lead, Elizabeth saw gold, and vice versa. Consideration is fine, but reconsideration is finer. However, very time-consuming.

Elizabeth:  519 entries to read and sift and re-read and make lists and change them around. It was like being caught in a revolving door. The first thing was to find where we overlapped. Michelle [Elvy, NFFD chair] suggested a big pot of tea or a bottle of wine while reading. It was important to take breaks. There were themes that emerged: couples contemplating splitting up with neither knowing what the other was plotting, nature and bird life, love at first sight turning into rejection, soldiering on, sad and joyful juxtapositions. If I had to sum it up in one word I’d say LIFE.

James: What made the task especially difficult was not so much the number, but the sheer quality of the field. The early suggestion of a long list of thirty or so immediately became untenable given over 500 submissions. Even so, a long list of fifty – or one in ten – forced us to exclude many fine stories. It is remarkable how quickly the form has taken hold and generated so much quality writing, attracted so many gifted writers. I imagine it is the protean nature of flash fiction that gives it its wide appeal: it can be poetic, prosaic, illusive, elusive, allusive – all of Polonius’s categories. A piece can end with the finality of a trap, or with a door opening on magic. It can make your head spin.

Elizabeth:  James was superlative at making lists. Soon I had entries all over the place. Neat orderly lists (like an operating list in a hospital) would arrive from James and order would be restored. And as the lists were whittled down – and sometimes we had to jettison a favourite – a lovely collection began to emerge. Something for everyone: humour, snappy or snarling dialogue, the beauty of the land, a distinctive New Zealand way of looking at things (leavened by entries about the wider world). I kept thinking what a marvellous form flash fiction is, capable of such infinite variety, both telling and solving things, sharp and contemplative at the same time, blunt but not excluding poetic. It was a privilege (that overused word) to be one of this year’s judges.

James : A privilege, certainly, and a pleasure. We were so pleased with our final selection not least because of the range, as Elizabeth has said. Our Long List is not only a ‘lovely collection’ but one which showcases the myriad possibilities of the genre. A writer friend, new to FF which she had previously rather pooh-poohed, recently told me she had become addicted to the form. Perhaps flash fiction should come with a health warning.

Our warmest congratulations to those flash fiction addicts, new and old, who have made the list. You gave us headaches and collywobbles at times, but we bear you no resentment, and nor do we have to speak for your stories: they speak for themselves.

 

~~~

The 2016 NFFD Short List

Calligraphy by Sue Wootton – Dunedin

May 1941: Day & Night in Crete by Sam Averis – Christchurch

Mayday by Dione Jones – Manukau/ Auckland

Now you are a curved white boat by Trisha Hanifin – Auckland

Rewilding by Zoë Meager – Christchurch

Shape Shifters on the Bus by Nod Ghosh – Christchurch

Standing Water by Sam Averis – Christchurch

The Maiming of Uncle Po by Heather McQuillan – Christchurch

The Wheat Field by Linda Moser – Christchurch

Trampolining in the Matukituki by Heather McQuillan – Christchurch

~~~

The 2016 NFFD Long List

A family holiday by Maggie Rainey-Smith – Wellington  

A foodie talks to her therapist by Leanne Radojkovich – Auckland  

An approach to keeping cacti by Rachel Fenton – Auckland  

Angels with Ochre Faces by Charle Farnell – Blenheim

Back on the Shore by Tracey Peterson – Christchurch 

Beach by Alex Stronach – Wellington

Black as coal by Jacqueline MacDonald – Thames-Hauraki

Bonsai Battlefield by Sue Kingham – Christchurch

Calligraphy by Sue Wootton – Dunedin  

Clear and Strong by Kamala Jackson – Whangarei 

Dear Editor by Tim Upperton – Palmerston North

Diary of a Mannequin by Michael Gilad – Auckland 

Dragonfly Collage by Gail Ingram – Christchurch  

Ex Libris by Michael Harlow – Alexandra

Fracture by Christina O’Reilly – Rongotea 

Friends by the milligram by Alex Stronach – Wellington  

Hopscotch and Riots by Himali McInnes – Auckland 

I’ll do you a deal by Heather Bauchop – Dunedin

Immediate Assistance Required by Adrian McCauley – Oamaru  

In the Dead Yellow Grass by Lilla Csorgo – Carterton  

Leaving Day by Rhonda Bartle – New Plymouth 

May 1941: Day & Night in Crete by Sam Averis – Christchurch  

Mayday by Dione Jones – Manukau/ Auckland  

Meet the Examiner by Mary-anne Scott – Central District 

My Mind Is Clear by Rachel Smith – Christchurch  

New Beginnings by Nikki Crutchley – Cambridge  

Now you are a curved white boat by Trisha Hanifin – Auckland  

Once by Amanda Barusch – Dunedin   

Ophelia at Huntly by Sian Williams – Kerikeri  

Rewilding by Zoë Meager – Christchurch  

Salt by Lynne Kohen – Nelson 

Sara Jane by Doug Dautel – Auckland  

Serafina’s Star by Sandra Arnold – Christchurch  

Settlement by Jac Jenkins – Northland  

Shape Shifters on the Bus by Nod Ghosh – Christchurch  

Standing Water by Sam Averis – Christchurch  

Stolen by Lee Kimber – Ohaupo 

Sweet Music by Catherine Barriga – Dunedin  

The Bookseller by Greg Hall – Auckland  

The Helping Hand by Heather Sylvawood – Geraldine  

The little ones by Kate Mahony – Wellington  

The Maiming of Uncle Po by Heather McQuillan – Christchurch  

The Moon in a Bowl of Water by Michael Harlow – Alexandra 

The Wheat Field by Linda Moser – Christchurch  

The Window is closed by Rachel Smith – Christchurch

Toad enjoyed a cup of tea by Wade Bishop – Christchurch  

Trampolining in the Matukituki by Heather McQuillan – Christchurch 

Whanau by Mary More – Porirua  

What we talk about when we talk about the Treaty by Rachel Fenton – Auckland  

Wild Peas and Red Valerian by Jane Percival – Kaipara Harbour   

You brought the plaits by Marie McGuigan – Christchurch

*

The winning stories will be published in the special winter edition of  Flash Frontier: An Adventure in Short Fiction –– forthcoming in July.

One thought on “Winners

  1. Pingback: Congratulations SIWA! - South Island Writers' Association

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s